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This crazy post from "stupididiotic" got us thinking...

pizzabadge lots

We get a lot of name badges at conferences.

Most are pretty standard. But some are clever, or weird, or funny.

 

There is the old "Hello, my name is" badge, where the delegate fills it in himself. 

Of course, there are always a few jokers! :)

bedInigo

 

You can limit the choices a bit by pre-printing the names, and supplying ribbons that are added to the bottom of the namebadge. Let the delegate choose, at the registration desk.

Some cheeky, some serious, some creepy - just like the people at every event! :)

fun-ribbons

We paricularly like these ones, from TED Active.

"Talk to me about..." badges are perfect conversation starters.

Instead of that awkward small talk, you can pick a subject that the delegate is passionate about.

 

TEDactive1    Tedactive2

 

In the useful arena, there are badges with QR codes that lead to the delegate's website/social media page/profile.

This is an easier way to get to know people than collecting business cards and stuffing them into your conference bag.

qr

And then there's the back-of-the-badge area, so often forgotten.

Use it for:

  • a venue map
  • condensed programme
  • short bio of keynote speakers
  • contact details for venue, organisers, taxi service
  • anything else that might be useful to the delegate

 

mapbadge

Seen any good ones? Tell us in the comments!

 

Do you have this problem?

Delegates register for your event, then don't pay.

And you waste hours chasing them for payment. Aaargh!!

Here's an easier way...

As from today, you’ll find a new button at the foot of your registrations on each event.

unpaid1

Clicking it will bring up a list of everyone who has an outstanding balance (this assumes you are capturing the payments on our system)

You can then send one of 3 reminders to these delegates (click the top tickbox to select them all, or choose who to send to).

Reminder types are:

  • Just a reminder (no time limit)
  • A reminder saying they have 48 hours to pay before their registration is deleted.
  • A reminder saying they have 7 days to pay before their registration is deleted.

unpaid2

We don’t actually delete – we leave that to your discretion.

You can select who to delete, and click the DELETE button if/when you wish.

We hope this proves to be a big time-saver for you! :)

 

Our online registration system - always improving

On all new registration forms, you'll be able to close registration (and even re-open them) without needing to ask us :)

Just click the button to the left of the registration form.

openclose

"If you build it, they will come" does not apply to events. 

Not unless you are One Direction or have a similar following of millions, watching your every move.

Allow me a short rant. 

In the past few months I have personally experienced:

  • A major conference sending me an emailed invitation a week before the event - no website, not even a programme! Who books to go to an event without knowing the topics/speakers?
  • A invitation to a seminar, with an "email us to register" (aaargh!). Doing so results in a "mailbox full" bounce-back. You won't believe it, but this is the second time this has happened with the same organiser (I use the word with a big pinch of salt). Think how many more delegates they would have, with an efficient online booking system.
  • No social media presence whatsoever for an event -  a conference about innovation, no less. No website, no Facebook page/event, nothing. I heard about the event via the grapevine, went looking...  nada!
  • An event organiser's website with contact details that don't work and links to pages that don't exist.

(While I was writing this blog post, an email arrived for an "advanced PA" masterclass, full of spelling mistakes and grammatical errors. Ummm.. no, thanks. Not very professional.)


emptyThe mind boggles.

How do these people stay in business? How badly is their bottom line affected by this inefficiency and lack of insight?

A few years ago, I went to a concert by two internationally acclaimed guitarists. Fantastic show! There were 6 of us in the audience. Why? Because they didn't advertise at all. They assumed people would just come. But the people didn't know.

Don't make the same mistake.

Market, market, market - tell your audience, then remind them a couple of times. Make it easy-peasy for them to book a seat. Don't expect them to repeatedly phone you for information - ensure it's available online.

This isn't rocket science.

It's basic common sense.

Which as we know, isn't that common :)

If you need help with anything mentioned above (event website, online registration, social media, online advertising), drop us a line, and we'll get you sorted out. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

 

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